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Archive for the ‘Home Buyer Tax Credit’ Category

First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit Extended For Armed Service Members
by Carla L. Davis

The expiration date of the $8,000 first-time home buyer may have already passed for most, but there are some potential homebuyers who can still take advantage of this great opportunity.

For those who are qualified service members, you have an extra year to cash in on the credit. Your new deadline is April 30, 2011. The government defines “qualified service member” as a member of the uniformed services of the U.S military, a member of the Foreign Service of the U.S., or an employee of the intelligence community.”

The reasoning behind this extension is simple. National Association of Home Builders Chairman, Bob Jones, says, “Congress recognized that many service members may have missed out on the home buyer tax credit due to being posted overseas. It is only fitting that they be given another year to take advantage of this opportunity in appreciation of the sacrifices they have made serving our country.”

There has been another modification to the credit for members of the armed service. Currently, a buyer must repay the credit if they move out of their new home within three years. This particular contingency has been waived if the move is due to government ordered extended duty service.

Buyers must meet the other qualification for the credit, however, including the income limits. These limits are set at $125,000 for single taxpayers and $225,000 for married taxpayers filing joint returns.

You must be a first-time home buyer, which is defined as “a buyer who has not owned a principal residence during the three-year period prior to the purchase. For married taxpayers, the law tests the homeownership history of both the home buyer and his/her spouse.”

If you don’t fit under this definition, then be sure to check into the $6,500 repeat buyer tax credit.

To get the first-time home buyers credit, you will need to claim it on your federal income tax return. There is a specific form (IRS Form 5405) that helps you determine how much the credit will be. Be sure to talk to your tax professional about the credit to ensure it is submitted correctly.

For those interested in the credit, you can visit FederalHousingTaxCredit.com to find out more information.

Published: May 4, 2010

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Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives (HAFA) was introduced to simplify and streamline the short sale process. HAFA accomplishes this in the following ways: 

  • Compliments the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) by providing viable alternatives for borrowers who are HAMP-eligible
  • Utilizes borrower financial and hardship information collected in conjunction with HAMP, eliminating the need for additional eligibility analysis
  • Allows the borrower to receive pre-approved short sale terms prior to the property listing
  • Prohibits the servicer from requiring, as a condition of approving the short sale, a reduction in the real estate commission agreed upon in the listing agreement
  • Requires that borrowers be fully released from future liability for the debt
  • Uses standard processes, documents and time frames
  • Provides financial incentives to borrowers, servicers and investors

HAFA provides financial incentives as follows: 

  • Financial incentives for lenders participating in the program include a $1,000 servicing bonus
  • Homeowners can receive up to $1,500 in relocation assistance (which, in some cases, may classify as taxable income) after a short sale or deed-in-lieu has been executed
  • Lenders pay all servicing fees – homeowners suffer zero out-of-pocket expenses

If you (or someone you know) are a homeowner looking for answers, or would like to determine if you qualify for HAFA, contact me at 303-942-0648.  I’m here to help.  

Sources:

HousingWire “Treasury to Announce New Program to Avoid Foreclosure” (2009): http://www.housingwire.com/2009/10/12/treasury-to-announce-new-program-to-avoid-foreclosure/

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Shelli Dore

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…Remember! The next time you are in a conversation with someone who is thinking about a move – IN ANY CITY OR STATE IN THE US OR CANADA – call me first! I can help make sure your friends, family members and work associates are very well taken care of.

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve on Tuesday repeated its pledge to hold interest rates at record lows to foster the economic recovery and ease high unemployment.

But the Fed’s assessment of the economy at its meeting Tuesday was a bit more upbeat. It said the job market is stabilizing, which was an improvement from its January statement when it said the deterioration in the labor market was abating.

It also said business spending on equipment and software has risen significantly, also an upgrade from its last assessment.

Still, the Fed cautioned that consumer spending could be dampened by high unemployment, weak wage growth, lower wealth and tight credit. And it noted weakness in the commercial real-estate and homebuilding markets.

“The Fed painted the economy in a slightly brighter shade,” said Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group. “It’s been painted black for so long. Now, it is a lighter shade of gray.”

The Fed held its target range for its bank lending rate at zero to 0.25 percent, where it’s been since December 2008. In response, commercial banks’ prime lending rate, used to peg rates on certain credit cards and consumer loans, has remained about 3.25 percent — its lowest in decades.

Super-low rates benefit borrowers who qualify for loans and are willing to take on more debt. But low rates are hard on people living on fixed incomes and earning scant returns on their savings.

The Fed’s pledge to keep record-low rates for an “extended period” relieved investors. The Dow Jones industrial average finished the day up nearly 44 points. Before the announcement, it had posted a gain in the single digits.

Prices for Treasurys rose slightly. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury fell to 3.66 percent from 3.68 percent just before the announcement.

The Fed made no changes to a program to drive down mortgage rates and bolster the housing market, even as a government report Tuesday showed housing construction tumbling in February.

Source: The Denver Post
03/17/2010 01:29:32 AM MDT
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Shelli Dore

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…Remember! The next time you are in a conversation with someone who is thinking about a move – IN ANY CITY OR STATE IN THE US OR CANADA – call me first! I can help make sure your friends, family members and work associates are very well taken care of.

Here’s the latest tip from The Mortgage Experts:

The IRS form to claim the $8,000 tax credit for first-time homebuyers and the $6,500 tax credit for long-time residents has finally been published by the IRS.  We have the form and the instructions available on our web site.

Follow this link to our web site and click on the link at the bottom of the home page.  There is also a link just below the link to the tax credit form that will take you to the instructions for completing the form.

Read More!

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Your friend in the real estate business,

Shelli Dore

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…Remember! The next time you are in a conversation with someone who is thinking about a move – IN ANY CITY OR STATE IN THE US OR CANADA – call me first! I can help make sure your friends, family members and work associates are very well taken care of.

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions on the changes to the Homebuyer Tax Credit:

Question: Existing homeowner credit: Must the new house cost more than the old house?

Answer: No. Thus, for example, individuals who move from a high cost area to a lower cost area who meet all eligibility requirements will qualify for the $6500 credit.

Question: I am an existing homeowner. On October 25, 2009, I signed a contract to purchase a new home. I have lived in my current home for more than 5 consecutive years and am within the new income limits. I will go to settlement on November 20. If President Obama has signed the bill by the time I go to settlement, will I qualify for the new $6500 tax credit?

Answer: Yes. The existing homeowner credit goes into effect for purchases after the date of enactment (when the bill is signed). There is no reference to the date of contract for the new credit. The provision looks solely to the date of purchase, which is generally the date of settlement.

Question: I am a first-time homebuyer but was not within the prior income limits at the time I entered into my contract to purchase on October 30, 2009. I will be covered, however, by the new income limits. If the new rules have been signed into law by the time I go to settlement, will I be eligible for a credit?

Answer: Yes. The new income limitations go into effect as soon as the President has signed the bill. The income limit and other eligibility rules will look to your status as of the date of purchase, which is the settlement date. So if the new rules have been signed when you go to settlement, you should be eligible for the credit (or a portion of the credit if you’re within the phaseout range).

Question: I am an eligible existing homeowner. I have a fair amount of equity in my home. I have found a home with a nonnegotiable price of $825,000. Will I be able to use any of the $6500 tax credit?

Answer: No. The $800,000 cap on the cost of the purchased home is firm at $800,000. Any amount above $800,000 makes the home ineligible for any portion of the credit. The $800,000 is an absolute ceiling.

Question: I owned my home for 10 years, but sold it two years ago year and have been renting since. If I purchase a home, will I be eligible for the $6500 tax credit if I meet all the other eligibility tests?

Answer: Yes. Because you lived in the home for more than 5 consecutive years of the previous 8, you will qualify for the $6500 credit. For example, Say John and his wife bought a home in 2000 and lived there until 2008 when he got a divorce. Whether John has been renting or bought in the interim, he WOULD INDEED be eligible for the credit because he owned a home and occupied it as his principal residence for 5 consecutive years out of the last 8 years. The keyword here is “consecutive.” As long as he lived in that house for 5 years straight what he did since 3 years doesn’t impact eligibility.

Question: I am an eligible first-time homebuyer. I entered into a contract to purchase on November 1, 2009. Do I have to go to closing before December 1? How does the extension date affect me?

Answer: You do not have to close before December 1. Once the legislation has been signed, it will be as if the Nov 30 date had never existed. Therefore, so long as the contract settles before April 30 (or July 1, worst case), the purchaser will be eligible for the credit.

National Association of REALTORS® Government Affairs Division

500 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington DC, 20001

Your friend in the real estate business,

Shelli Dore

Friend me on Facebook!
Connect with me on LinkedIn!
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…Remember! The next time you are in a conversation with someone who is thinking about a move – IN ANY CITY OR STATE IN THE US OR CANADA – call me first! I can help make sure your friends, family members and work associates are very well taken care of.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 authorizes a tax credit of up to $8,000 for qualified first-time home buyers purchasing a principal residence on or after January 1, 2009 and before December 1, 2009.

The following questions and answers provide basic information about the tax credit. If you have more specific questions, we strongly encourage you to consult a qualified tax advisor or legal professional about your unique situation.

1. Who is eligible to claim the tax credit?
First-time home buyers purchasing any kind of home—new or resale—are eligible for the tax credit. To qualify for the tax credit, a home purchase must occur on or after January 1, 2009 and before December 1, 2009. For the purposes of the tax credit, the purchase date is the date when closing occurs and the title to the property transfers to the home owner.

2. What is the definition of a first-time home buyer?

Click here for all FAQs!


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